Friday, June 08, 2012

5 Spice Powder Ham Chim Peng (Asian Fried Bread)


I tried the sweet one with the red bean filling earlier but I had the soft spot for the savory 5-spice powder ham chim peng.  While looking through my recipes for the pumpkin cake recipe, I came across the red bean paste ham chim peng recipe and I immediately craved for the savory ham chim peng.   Reading through the recipe, I thought I could make it work with the savory ham chim peng.  My mind was set and I set to work the next day.


Glad to say that it was not bad at all considering the steps were very straight forward and easy.  Crispy on the outside and soft inside with hint of saltiness and 5-spice powder.  We had enough for lunch, snack and breakfast the next day.

Crispy on the outside and soft inside



Ingredients:

  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp. baking powder
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. oil (canola or melted butter) I used canola oil.
  • 180ml water

Filling:
  • 1 tsp. Sea salt / salt
  • 1 tsp. 5 spice powder

Method:

1.  In a big mixing bowl, add in flour and baking powder, whisk well.  Add in sugar, mix well.

2.  Add in oil and water.  Use your hand to mix and knead into a smooth dough.  Add a little extra flour if needed.  Dough will be sticky.  Cover with a cling wrap and let it proves for an hour for until double in size.


3.  Spread some flour on your working surface.  Roll your dough to a rectangle shape.  Spread the top with salt and 5 spice powder.


4.  Roll it up Swiss roll style gently. 


5.  Cut into pieces and place on parchment lined baking sheet or Silpat.


6.  Let it rest for 15-30 minutes, cover with a cling wrap.


7.  Heat up the wok with hot oil.  Test with a wood chopstick to see if it's bubbles.  Flatten the ham chim peng with your palm.  Stretch it out and slowly drop into the hot oil.  Deep-fry until golden brown on both sides.


8.  Drain on paper towel.  Eat warm or reheat in the microwave for 15 seconds to warm it up.  I made about 15 pieces.

11 comments:

WokandSpoon said...

Ham Chim Peng! Can't believe you made this from scratch. love this - I'll definitely be trying your red bean recipe as I love red bean!

tigerfish said...

I have a weak spot for savory Ham Chim Peng definitely. Hmmm, a 5 spice one then a sweet red bean one to finish it off will be perfect. Hahah, very greedy, right?

Vivian Pang said...

Great looking ham chim peng. Feel like having now. Homemade one definitely better than outside. Have a nice evening!

daphne said...

I love this little snack! u made it look so easy Ching!!

Navaneetham Krishnan said...

Goodness!! You actually made this, its superb and thumbs up to this gorgeous looking dessert. I normally just buy from the stalls because I thought that its such difficult one to make. Not any more after seeing your step by step sharing on this recipe. Love it very much.

stephanie said...

wow! I'm always too chicken to fry stuff at home. Those look so so tasty

Miss B @ Everybody Eats Well in Flanders said...

Ah finally I see a Ham Chim Peng recipe without using alkaline water which I have no idea what it is. I am gonna bookmark this recipe for the future when the HCP craving hits, thanks :)

Annemarie Hiew said...

hi , i just tried your recipe, but it didnt double in size :( i basically followed your instructions but i halved all the portions because i didnt want to make so many in case i screwed up >< any idea what went wrong?

Little Corner of Mine said...

Hi Annemarie, you meant when you proof it for an hour and it didn't double in size? Then, it might need longer proofing time (the temp. in your kitchen play a part too), just proof it until it double in size before you shape it. Or else it would end up hard.

Casey Tan said...

Hi, just wondering - if you don't use yeast, will it double in size? I thought proving dough normally involves yeast, not baking powder.

Casey

Little Corner of Mine said...

Hi Casey, I wish I can remember, I am regretting that I didn't take the before and after picture of the dough when proving. But it definitely will become bigger and puff out when deep-frying. Some Chinese deep-fried/pan-fried dough do not use yeast or baking powder.